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The effect of quitting smoking on hot flushes in women aged 45–54 years of age at baseline followed for 1–7 years was examined by Smith and his colleagues [1] in a longitudinal analysis published recently. A cohort study of hot flushes among women 45–54 years of age was conducted starting in 2006 among residents of Baltimore and its surrounding counties. Menopausal status was defined as follows: premenopausal women were those who experienced their last menstrual period within the past 3 months and reported 11 or more periods within the past year; perimenopausal women were those who experienced (1) their last menstrual period within the past year, but not within the past 3 months, or (2) their last menstrual period within the past 3 months and experienced 10 or fewer periods within the past year; postmenopausal women were those women who had not experienced a menstrual period within the past year. Participants were asked to complete a brief questionnaire during a clinic visit 3 weeks after the baseline visit, then annually after that. This questionnaire repeated all previous questions about hot flushes and smoking. Interestingly, they concluded that women who quit smoking were less likely to suffer from hot flushes, less likely to have severe hot flushes, and less likely to have frequent hot flushes than women who continued to smoke, but were more likely to suffer from any hot flushes, more severe hot flushes, and more frequent hot flushes than women who never smoked.

Author(s)

  • Randa Mostafa
    President of Emirates Menopause Society, Professor of Clinical Physiology and Head of Basic Medical Sciences Department, College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, UAE

Citations

International Menopause Society

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