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Moghassemi and colleagues [1] have recently reported the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in Iranian postmenopausal women and its relationship to levels of estradiol, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). This cross-sectional study was conducted in a clinical sample of 149 healthy, naturally postmenopausal women aged 43–64 years. Female sexual function was evaluated by utilizing the Female Sexual Function Index. Hormonal serum concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean age of the women was 52.19 ± 3.76 years with 47.48 ± 36.5 months of amenorrhea. In the study, 69.8% of women showed sexual dysfunction in the Desire domain, 61.7% in the Arousal domain, 49.7% in the Lubrication domain, 45% in the Pain domain, 40.3% in the Orgasm domain and 36.9% in the Satisfaction domain. There was no difference between the two groups – with and without dysfunction – in hormone levels and SHBG. The authors concluded that, in Iranian postmenopausal women, desire and arousal are the most prevalent menopausal sexual dysfunctions, and female sexual dysfunction is much more than just a hormonal problem.

Author(s)

  • Rossella Nappi
    Gynecological Endocrinology & Menopause Unit, University of Pavia, Italy

Citations

  1. Moghassemi S, Ziaei S, Haidari Z. Female sexual dysfunction in Iranian postmenopausal women: prevalence and correlation with hormonal profile. J Sex Med 2011 Jun 15. Epub ahead of print.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21676181
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